US WEEKLY
GOOD AS GOLD
Forget the hype, the Hollywood politics and all the silly hoopla that happens each award season. We don’t need an official Oscar nomination to know who advanced the motion-picture arts and sciences last year. Presenting the Uscars.
March 1999
By Laura Morice
Photo Editor Jennifer Crandall

Forget the hype, the Hollywood politics and all the silly hoopla that happens each award season. We don’t need an official Oscar nomination to know who advanced the motion-picture arts and sciences last year. Presenting the Uscars.

(Excerpts)


230U-021-002

David Kelly
Best Supporting Actor
Waking Ned Devine

Despite a bevy of other memorable nude scenes during the 1998 movie season, none compare with David Kelly’s buck-naked motorcycle ride in “Waking Ned Devine’. The Dublin-born Kelly, who has worked primarily as a stage actor (Waiting for Godot, Candida) and enjoyed cult status for John Cleese’s British TV series “Fawlty Towers,” has waited 69 years for this kind of silly yet poignant role. He plays Michael O’Sullivan, a jittery fellow who schemes with his best friend to take over a deceased neighbor’s winning lottery ticket. “It’s the best part I’ve ever had on film,” says Kelly. “(But) I’d never ridden a motorbike. When the day came to shoot the scene, I though, oh, God, here we go. I was so cold. And my backside kept sliding off. And I thought, oh, God, I am going to die.


230V-050-020

Edward Norton
Best Actor
American History X

For his role as neo-Nazi Derek Vineyard in “American History X”, Edward Norton pumped iron, guzzled protein shakes and ate “everything in sight” for three solid months. “I got really large and tough,” he reports. A good thing, too, since he would need his strength. Not only did the film’s director, Tony Kaye, insist on losing his director’s credit (he didn’t like New Line’s final cut, but Norton stands by it) but there was also that little matter of how to make a violent skinhead sympathetic to audiences. Norton, a 1990 Yale graduate who got an Oscar nomination his first time out (for 1996’s ‘Primal Fear’), found the acting exercise intriguing. “The character is monolithically horrible,” says Norton, 29. “But the audience is forced to deal with the tragic circumstances that have shaped this guy’s life –and in some ways sympathize with him. As an actor, that was the challenge.” Note to Norton: You succeeded.

END